The Mordfin Blog - Trusted Guidance, Pertinent Finance Topics, & Accounting News...

Submit A File
Mordfin on LinkedIn Mordfin on Google+ Mordfin on Facebook Mordfin on Twitter

MORDFIN Blog

Protecting youth sports leagues from fraud

October 3, 2019 Stuart Mordfin, CPA, CGMA sports league, league

Protecting youth sports leagues from fraudWho would defraud a kids’ organization? The answer, unfortunately, is that trusted adults sometimes steal from not-for-profits benefiting children. Youth sports leagues and teams, for example, are ripe for fraud. Cash transactions are common, and coaches and board members usually are volunteers with little accountability.

If you or your children are involved in a youth sports league, here’s what you can do to ensure that its funds support the kids, not thieves.

Segregate duties

By far the most important step leagues can take is to segregate duties. This means that no single individual receives, records and deposits funds coming in, pays bills and reconciles bank statements.

So one person might handle deposits and payments, another would receive and reconcile bank statements and a third would monitor the budget. Also, every payment (or at least payments over a certain threshold) should be signed by two individuals. If your league has credit or debit cards, someone who isn’t an authorized card user should be assigned to review the statements.

Some simple steps

Other procedures can help prevent fraud. For example, if your league still uses paper registrations and accepts payment by cash or check, look into electronic payment options. Cash can be pocketed in the blink of an eye, and checks can be diverted to thieves’ own accounts. But with online registration, payments are deposited directly into the league’s account.

Also, monitor your league’s treasurer. People in this position are the most likely youth sports league officials to commit fraud because they have the easiest access to funds and the ability to cover their tracks. No one person should stay in the treasurer position for more than a couple of years. If funds are available, your league might consider hiring a part-time bookkeeper who will report directly to the board.

The treasurer should submit a report to the board of directors for every board meeting, with bank statements attached. And your board should receive and review financial reports at least quarterly — including when the league isn’t in season.

What fraud perpetrators hope

You may have a hard time believing that anyone in your community would steal from a youth organization. But that’s just what fraud perpetrators hope you’ll think. So put some basic fraud controls in place; then sit back and enjoy the game!

© 2019

Stuart Mordfin, CPA, CGMA

Written by Stuart Mordfin, CPA, CGMA

Stuart M. Mordfin has over 30 years of experience as a certified public accountant. He has worked with clients in such diverse industries as manufacturing, publishing, real estate development and operations, jewelry and other luxury products, retail, restaurants, a variety of professional service companies. In addition he has on numerous occasions worked as a court appointed accountant on receiverships, guardianships and bankruptcies. Stuart has developed and expanded his CPA practice through innovation, well-informed decision-making, and creative, proactive thinking. Stuart M. Mordfin joined the firm in 1987, and has been a partner since 1999. He became managing partner in 2004. Since his entrée into the firm, Stuart has lead the way for its expansion into financial planning services through the formation of Mordfin Financial & Business Advisors LLC. Stuart works with many family-owned businesses. Experiencing firsthand what it means to be an integral part of the family business, Stuart is able to offer a unique and valuable perspective to his clients. He is well qualified to assist family-owned businesses move from one generation to the next.

Subscribe to Email Updates

Lists by Topic

see all

Posts by Topic